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Doble Baston - Filipino Kali Double Sticks


Doble Baston (Double Stick
s) is undoubtedly one of the most powerful sub-systems of the Filipino Martial Arts. It covers an amazing array of combinations that teach the practitioner to utilize two weapons of equal length, such as sticks, swords, etc. Doble Baston drills are designed to flow seamlessly from striking to blocking while giving the practitioner the ability to use the weapon in either hand or both at the same time.
 

Inosanto/LaCoste Kali Doble Baston Variations  

Sinawali is a Filipino Martial Arts (FMA) term referring to a structured double sticks pattern. These drills can be done solo or with a partner, and are common to many styles. The name Sinawali came from the Tagalog word “Sawali, a woven split bamboo mats used as walls of nipa huts, and literally means weaving. The crisscrossing movements of Sinawali weapons fighting mimic the pattern of these mats hence the name.


The high-speed nature of
Sinawali drills is good for developing fast reaction. The rapid-fire contact of sticks in these drills will sharpen one’s awareness of motion. Developing the strength and coordination of both hands is another benefit of Sinawali training. Most of these drills teach the practitioner to relate the movement of the weak hand to that of the strong hand hence promoting
ambidexterity.
Some of the variations are easy, while others will take considerably more time to master. While most of these variations have little or no "combat" application, they will increase stick discipline, coordination and timing as well as add variety to your Inosanto/LaCoste Kali training regimen. Following are a number of ways to train the double sticks Sinawali patterns:

Matching (standard): Match strike for strike i.e. right for right and left for left.
Offside Matching: Start any series on the "off" or left side, matching strike for strike.
Mirror: Meet all strikes with opposite hand strike i.e. left for right and right for left.
Chaining: Adding or "chaining" sinawali counts together i.e. chaining Abecedario 4 Count to Ikis 6 Count.
Redondo: Meeting each strike with a redondo strike with either hand.
Isolating: Countering every strike with one stick; this includes using both hands as well as transitioning from right to left.
Complementary: Countering all high strikes with one hand and all low strikes with the other hand i.e. left for all high strikes and right for all low strikes.
Blocking: Countering all strikes with medium range blocks as opposed to strikes.
Break-In and Break-Out: Developing the timing necessary to enter and exit a sinawali series.
Countering: Using the same or different sinawali series to counter a specific sinawali.
Following: Transitioning from one sinawali series to another without interruption; i.e. following someone.
Chambers: Performing sinawali series from any chamber or while changing chambers: open, closed or mixed.
Transposing: Changing to different variations of a sinawali series and then returning to the basic series.
Moving: Developing sensitivity to distance while moving: forward, backward, left, right, circling, to one knee, to both knees and onto your back.
Changing Grips: Going from standard, bottom and center grips within a sinawali series.
Sinawali vs Different Weapons: Maintaining sinawali series versus a variety of weapons i.e. single stick, stick & dagger, single & double dagger, two-handed stick and staff.


Inosanto/LaCoste Kali Doble Baston
Variations  

Sinawali six count with 64 variables:
1. I-I-I Family (Inward-Inward-Inward)
2. I-B-B Family (Inward- Backhand-Backhand)
3. I-B-I Family (Inward-Backhand-Inward)
4. I-I-B Family (Inward-Backhand-Inward)
5. B-B-B Family (Backhand-Backhand-Backhand)
6. B-I-I Family (Backhand-Inward-Inward)
7. B-B-I Family ( Backhand-Backhand-Inward)
8. B-I-B Family (Backhand-Inward-Backhand
)
Total Variables: 512

Key to variables
:
1. H-H-H (High-High-High)
2. L-L-L (Low-Low-Low)
3. H-L-H (High-Low-High)
4. L-H-L (Low-High-Low
5. L-L-H (Low-Low-High)
6. H-H-L (High-High-Low)
7. L-L-H (Low-Low-High)
8. H-L-L (High-Low-Low)
9. ...

Breakdown for six count Sinawali patterns Inosanto/LaCoste Kali:
1. H-H-H 1. H-H-H
2. H-H-L 2. H-H-L
3. H-H-L 3. H-H-L
4. H-L-H 4. H-L-H
5. L-H-L 5 L-H-L
6. L-L-L 6. L-L-L
7. L-L-H 7. L-L-H
8. L-H-H 8. L-H-H
You develop the combinations above example #1 with #8, #4 with #7 etc.

 

Sinawali Patterns  

Note: All striking patterns are from right closed position

Heaven 6
R #1 (lobtik)
L #1 (lobtik)
R #2 (witik)
L #2 (lobtik)
R #2 (lobtik)
L #1 (witik)


Heaven 6 (Palabad Version)
R #1 (lobtik)
L #1 (lobtik)
R #1 (palabad)
L #2 (lobtik)
R #2 (lobtik)
L #2 (palabad)


Heaven 6 (Redondo Version)
R #1 (lobtik)
L #1 (lobtik)
R #12 (backhand redondo)
L #2 (lobtik)
R #2 (lobtik)
L #12 (backhand redondo)


Redondo 6
R #12 (forehand)
L #12 (backhand)
R #12 (backhand)
L #12 (forehand)
R #12 (backhand)
L #12 (forehand)


Heaven 6 (Bagsak Version)
R #1 (lobtik)
L #1 (lobtik)
R #1 (bagsak - middle level)
L #2 (lobtik)
R #2 (lobtik)
L #2 (bagsak - middle level)


Heaven Side 4 & Heaven 6 (Palabad Version) (14 Count High Series)
R #1 (witik)
L #1 (witik - place on top of right arm)
R #1 (witik)
L #1 (witik - place under right arm, into right closed position)
R #1 (lobtik)
L #1 (lobtik)
R #1 (palabad)
Note: Then repeat on other side to form a 14 count
Sinawali.


Earth Side 4 & Earth 3 (14 Count Low Series)
R #9 (witik)
L #9 (witik - place on top of right arm)
R #9 (witik)
L #9 (witik - above right arm, into left arm on top ready position)
R #9 (lobtik)
L #9 (witik - retract into atip position)
R #8 (witik - withdraw into left closed position)
Note: Then repeat on opposite side to form another 14 count
Sinawali.


14 Count Box Series (Done From Right Open Ready Position)
R #9 (witik - retract into abierta ready position)
L #9 (witik - retract under right in right closed chamber as right strikes)
R #1 (witik - retract into abierta position)
L #1 (witik - retract onto top of right arm as right arm strikes)
R #1 (lobtik)
L #1 (lobtik)
R #2 (witik)
Note: Then repeat on opposite side to form a high & low 14 count
Sinawali.
The above drill is designed to teach Heaven & Earth Side 4 and the Open ready position it is the first open ready position drill encountered as a siniwalli two man pattern.
R #2 (sickle - retract to abierta position)
L #1 (lobtik)
R #1 (lobtik)
L #1 (sickle - retract to abierta position)
R #2 (lobtik)
L #2 (lobtik)

 

Villabrille 8 Count
L
Backhand Bridge

R Lobtik

L Witik

R Witik

L Witik

3 Lobtiks

 

Lacosta 8 Count

H-L

H-H

H-L

L-L

 

Lacosta 10 Count

Kob-Kob

3 Count

Kob-Kob

3 Count

 

Lacosta 12 Count

Kob-Kob

Redondo

Abaniko

Backhand

Backhand

 

Bulan (Sun Line)

H-L

L-H Diagonal

 

Double Sticks Running Attacks Drills (7 Saints)

1. San Sabbathiel - Umbrella Heaven 3, Spinning Ordabis, Umbrella Heaven 3.
2. San Chamuel - PiPi 3, Spinning Ordabis, Redondo Heaven 3, Inward, low back hand, high backhand, spinning backhand, Redondo 3.
3. San Zaphiel - Heaven 3, Spinning Ordabis, Heaven 3.
4. San Miguel - Heaven 3, Spinning Ordabis, Redondo Heaven 3.
5. San Raphael - High-Low-High, Spinning Ordabis, Redondo Heaven 3.

Version A: right side High, Low, High entry to Spin to 3 backhands (High, Low, High with left hand) to umbrella 3 then repeat on left side.
Version B: right side High, Low, High entry to reverse 1 with rear cross over step and low backhand spin out to umbrella 3 repeat on left side High, Low, High entry to reverse 2 with rear cross over step and low backhand spin out to umbrella 3.
6. San Uriel - Double-Double-Double, Spinning Ordabis, Redondo Heaven 3.

Double the 1 and the 2 to reverse 1 with rear cross over step and low backhand spin out to umbrella 3 repeat on left side High, Low, High entry to reverse 2 with rear cross over step and low backhand spin out to umbrella 3.
7. San Gabriel - PiPi-PiPi, Ikis-Ikis-Ikis, Spinning Ordabis, Redondo Heaven 3, Inward FH, low BH, high BH, X, X, X, spinning BH, Redondo 3.

Kob-Kob to 3 right Xs to 3 left Xs to reverse 1 with rear cross over step and low backhand spin out to umbrella 3 repeat on left side High, Low, High entry to reverse 2 with rear cross over step and low backhand spin out to umbrella 3.
 

Terms:
Ikis = X
PiPi = Weave

 

Sinawali Drills

Drill 1 Kob-Kob (PiPi 6)
Drill 2 Ikis Heaven 4 (Downward Figure 8s)
Drill 3 Abecedario 6 (Inward, low back hand, high back hand)
Drill 4 2 Count Entry to low back hand, high back hand
Drill 5 3 Count upward figure 8 low back hand, high back hand
Drill 6 3 downward figure 8s, low back hand, high back hand, upward figure 8s, low back hand, high back hand
Drill 7 Heaven 6
Drill 8 Heaven and Earth (Standard 6)
Drill 9 Earth 6
Drill 10 Upward 6 count (Left hand chambered on top of right hand [forehand, backhand, forehand])
Drill 11 Heaven Umbrella 6
Drill 12 Heaven and Earth Umbrella 6
Drill 13 Earth Umbrella 6
Drill 14 Abaniko 6 count (do as Heaven, Heaven/Earth, Earth)
Drill 15 LaCoste 8 count (Prefix of High/Low stays the same then do add in Heaven, Heaven/Earth, Earth)
Drill 16 LaCoste 10 count (start with Kob-Kob)
Drill 17 LaCoste 12 count (start with Kob-Kob to redondo that misses to witick backhand backhand)
Drill 18 Villabrille 8 count
Drill 19 Abecedario 1st stage with double stick
s feed (1st variation receive from open position, 2nd option receive from a open and closed position)
Drill 20 Villabrille 16 count (Villabrille 8 count on both sides)
Drill 21 Villabrille 12 count (start open then at 6, witik)
Drill 22 Abecedario 3rd stage [open to closed positions
(return 3 or more blows)], 2nd option receive from option position (Feed with single stick and double stick)
Drill 23 Double stick 5 count contra sumbrada (Right/Left sides)

Advanced Sinawali
½ T, middle, high, low finish with umbrella 3
Variation 1: mix with Abecedario 1st stage and so on
Variation 2: Heaven six
thrust on forehand line on both right and left sides, add footwork
Variation 3: Gunting the angle one match and unmatch right and left sides (ex: gunting then counter with one stick)
Variation 4: One stick in reverse grip right and left hands(use double tap to recover rhythm if you miss)
Variation 5: Do Kob-Kob them switch to reverse grip into heaven six

 

Abecedario Weapon Progression

The Abecedario weapon progression is used in conjunction with the Abecedario training progression to get a "complete education" in the variables possible with the major weapons in Filipino Kali.


Stage I Olisi y Daga vs Olisi y Daga
Stage II Olisi vs Olisi y Daga
Stage III Doble Olisi vs Olisi y Daga
Stage IV Olisi vs Olisi
a) Strike with middle of stick
b) Strike with tip of stick
(Punta)
c) Strike with butt of stick
(Punyo)
Stage V Doble Olisi vs Doble Olisi
Stage VI Solo Daga vs Doble Daga
Stage VIII Doble Daga vs Doble Daga

 

Terms:

Olisi - Single Stick

Doble Olisi - Double Sticks

Daga - Knife

Doble Daga - Double Knives
 

Lameco Eskrima Double Sticks Training Progression

Note: Unless directed differently, assume that you are starting with the right stick in a high right chamber, and the left stick in a low right chamber.

Solo Kadena (6 Count)
RH Angle 1 flowing strike, LH Angle 1 flowing strike, RH Angle 12 flowing strike...
Doble Kadena (8 Count)
RH Angle 1 Doblete strike, LH Angle 1 flowing strike, RH Angle 12 flowing strike...
Solo Kadena Abaniko (12 Count)
RH Angle 1 flowing strike followed by a horzontal abaniko and an Angle 1 flowing strike, LH Angle 1 flowing strike, RH Angle 12 flowing strike...
Doble Kadena Abaniko (14 Count)
RH Angle 1 Doblete strike followed by a horizontal abaniko and an Angle 1 flowing strike, LH Angle 1 flowing strike, RH Angle 12 flowing strike...
Dos Manos Dos Labahas (4 Count)
LH Angle 1 flowing strike followed by a RH Angle 1 flowing strike...
Dos Manos Doblete (6 Count)
LH Angle 1 flowing strike followed by a RH Angle 1 Doblete strike...
Dos Manos De Campo 1-2-3 (10 Count)
RH Angle 1 broken strike followed by an Angle 12 flowing strike and an Angle 1 flowing strike, LH Angle 1 flowing strike, RH Angle 12 flowing strike...
Dos Manos De Campo 1-2-3 Doblete (12 Count)
RH Angle 1 broken strike followed by an Angle 12 flowing strike and an Angle 1 Doblete strike, LH Angle 1 flowing strike, RH Angle 12 flowing strike...
Dos Manos Dos Labahas De Campo
1-2-3 (16 Count)
RH Angle 1 broken strike follwed by an Angle 12 flowing strike and an Angle 1 flowing strike and Abaniko to an Angle 1 flowing strike, LH Angle 1 flowing strike, RH Angle 12 flowing strike...
Dos Manos Dos Labahas De Campo 1-2-3 Doblete Abaniko (18 Count)
RH Angle 1 broken strike followed by an Angle 12 flowing strike and an Angle 1 Doblete strike and an Abaniko to an Angle 1 flowing strike, LH Angle 1 flowing strike, RH Angle 12 flowing strike...
Dos Manos Kali Saez (6 Count from Double High Chamber)
RH Angle 1 flowing strike to backhand witik followed by a
n Angle 4 flowing strike...
Dos Manos Dos Labahas Totsada (8 Count from Right Double Low Load)
RH Angle 10 thrust to LH Angle 10 thrust on low line to RH Angle 10 thrust to LH Angle 10 thrust on high line...
Dos Manos Dos Labahas Serada (6 Count on the left side and 8 Count on the right side)
(With sticks crossed left over right) LH Angle 4 flowing strike, RH Angle 12 flowing strike to Angle 4 flowing strike, LH Angle 1 flowing strike, RH Angle 1 flowing strike... Cross sticks, RH Angle 4 flowing strike, LH Angle 12 flowing strike to Angle 4 flowing strike, RH Angle 1 flowing strike to Angle 4 flowing strike, LH Angle 1 flowing strike, RH Angle 1 flowing strike.


The importance of ambidexterity in
Filipino Kali weapons fighting

Ambidexterity is the ability of being equally skilful with each hand. Attaining ambidexterity is crucial to any individual who must depend on a weapon for survival because in real combat, you are doomed if you can’t wield your stick, knife or gun proficiently with your other hand the moment your dominant hand got injured.

The ancient Greek physician Plato, considered the father of Western medicine encouraged people to train for ambidexterity, “
Practice all the operations, performing them with each hand and with both together—for they are both alike—your object being ready to attain ability, grace, speed, painlessness, elegance and readiness..

On what defines handedness, modern science has this to say: “There tends to be no real difference in the strength or dexterity of the hands themselves. The main reason for handedness lies in hereditary factors that determine which side of the brain will be more developed and therefore dominant. Typically the left side of the brain controls the left side of the head but the right side of the body. Likewise, the right side of the brain predominantly controls the right side of the head but the left side of the body. This is because the nerves crossover at the back of the neck. Thus people with a dominant left side of the brain tend to be right handed, In fact, 97% of right handers are left-brain dominant. Contrary to what might be expected, 68% of left handers are also left-brain dominant. About 19% of lefties and 3% of righties are right-brain dominant. About 12% of lefties (close to 1% of the total population) show about equal dominance on both sides.” (from What’s Right Is Right by David A. Gershaw, Ph.D.)

Being ambidextrous is an esteemed quality among fighting escrimadors. An excerpt from the life story of the late Leo Giron in Dan Inosanto’s The Filipino Martial Arts reads, “One of his instructors, a man the people called Mr. Delgado, used to travel from camp to camp to fight their best escrimadors. He was good, Giron remembers, and he could fight with either hand.”

In
Arnis, Eskrima and Kali, the most fundamental way of attaining ambidexterity is to practice double stick drills like sinawali. In these drills, the weak hand is developed by teaching it to borrow the movements of the dominant hand. There are designated roles for the dominant hand and the weak hand (often called the “
Alive Hand” because it’s never idle) in the Filipino martial arts. “If he were wielding a single weapon, the alive hand would be the one that didn’t have a weapon. If he were wielding a long and a short weapon, the alive hand would be the one with the shorter weapon. If he were empty-handed or wielding two equal-sized weapons, the alive hand would generally be the one that come to play second,” wrote Inosanto in The Filipino Martial Arts. Training your weak hand to become as functional as your dominant hand in combat means reversing these roles during practice.

A good way to start is by practicing the basic angles of attack with your weak hand. Begin by just achieving the proper form then later on practice each angle of attack separately with speed and power. Having attained proficiency in delivering individual strikes, advance to practicing techniques in combination. With that achieved, the next stage could be fine-tuning your form and flow by doing
Carenza or shadow fighting with your weak hand. Finally, just like in training the dominant hand, the final stage should be to spar using your weak hand.

It is good to take note of the development of specific attributes so you can fully gauge if your weak hand is catching up with the abilities of your dominant hand. First of these is power. Can you hit as hard or nearly as hard as your dominant hand with your weak hand? Is there a great difference in gripping strength between your left and right hands? How about speed and accuracy? How fast and accurately can you hit a target with your weak hand as compared to your dominant hand?

Besides intentional training in specific martial arts skills, another way of increasing your ambidexterity is by using your weak hands more often in simple everyday tasks like opening a jar, pouring a drink or reaching for things.

Not surprisingly, the quality of ambidexterity was also given importance by the old masters of Western
Fencing (some aspects of Arnis, Eskrima and Kali are borrowed from Western swordsmanship). A part of the book The Sword Through the Centuries by Alfred Hutton, reads, “From its not being an article of everyday wear, it (double sword) and its practice escaped the notice of most people, but it did not escape that of the leading professors of fence. They taught it, they teach the cultivation of it, and explained its method in their published works, and they earnestly advised their pupils to take up its study, on account of the advantage which a knowledge of its use would give them if engaged in a serious affair. Regardless as a game to be played in the sale d’ armes, the case of rapiers is more interesting than even the picturesque fight of the rapier and dagger, for in the latter the arms consist of a very long sword and a short dagger, and the player is therefore obliged to fight all through his bout as either a right-handed or as a left-handed man; but when provided with the ‘case,’ owing to the two swords being of moderate length and of equal size, he is in a position to change from right hand to left, or left to right, as the need to do so may flash across his mind, and that without the necessity of shifting his weapons, thereby altering instantaneously and radically the scheme of his play, and compelling a similar though unintended change in that of his adversary.”
 

 

Double Sticks Box Patterns

1. Block with Left, Strike with Right
2. Block with Right, Strike with Left
3. Assisted block, Strike with Right
4. Assisted block, Strike with Left

 

Inosanto/LaCoste Kali Sinawali Variations

Standard: "traditional" form of working the double sticks.
Mirror: one meets the adversary’s strikes with opposite hand, for example the partner serves a right blow with the right hand and I meet his striking with my left hand.
Redondo: one meets each striking with redondo.
Complementary: one meets all strikes with one hand high and all strikes with the other hand low.
Sequence: to connect several types of Sinawali, for example to bind Heaven 6 with Ikis 6 and Inayan 7.
Isolation: one meets all strikes with only one hand.


Double Sticks
Co-ordination Exercises:

1.PiPi 6
2
.Ikis heaven 4
3
.Abecedario 6
4
.Heaven 6, Standard 6 and Earth 6
5
.Abanico 6 count
6
.Lacoste 8 count
7
.Lacoste 10 count
8
.
Lacoste 12 count

Pi
Pi 6 (open position)
- blow high right witik (right)
- blow high right witik (left)
- blow average right witik (right)
- blow average right witik (left)
- blow low right witik (right)
- blow low right witik (left)

Ikis Heaven 4 (open position)
- blow high right lobtik (right)
- reverse high right lobtik (right)
- blow high right lobtik (left)
- left reverse lobtik (left)

Abecedario 6 (open position)
- blow high right lobtik (right)
- low reverse witik (right)
- high reverse lobtik (right)
- blow high right lobtik (left)
- low reverse witik (left)
- high reverse lobtik (left)

Heaven 6 (position right stick on the right shoulder, left stick under the right arm)
- right blow lobtik (right)
- reverse lobtik (left)
- reverse witik (right)
- right blow lobtik (left)
- reverse lobtik (right)
- reverse witik (left)

Heaven 6 becomes Standard 6 by making a low reverse and Earth 6 while making all strikes low

Abanico 6
- 3 abanico (right)
- reverse lobtik (left)
- reverse witik (right)
- right blow witik (left)
- 3 abanico (left)
- reverse lobtik (right)
- reverse witik (left)
- right blow witik (right)

Lacoste 8
- right blow lobtik (right)
- low reverse witik (right)
- reverse lobtik (left)
- reverse witik (right)
- right blow lobtik (left)
- low reverse witik (left)
- reverse lobtik (right)
- reverse witik (left)
you can vary the heights of strike 3, 4, 7 and 8

Lacoste 10 (abierta)
- right blow witik (right)
- right blow lobtik (left)
- right blow lobtik (right)
- reverse lobtik (left)
- reverse witik (right)
- right blow witik (left)
- right blow lobtik (right)
- right blow lobtik (left)
- reverse lobtik (right)
- reverse witik (left)

Lacoste 12 (abierta)
- right blow witik (right)
- right blow lobtik (left)
- right blow lobtik (right) of redondo type
- abaniko left temple (right)
- reverse lobtik (left)
- reverse lobtik (right)
- right blow witik (left)
- right blow lobtik (right)
- right blow lobtik (left) of redondo type
- abaniko right temple (left)
- reverse lobtik (right)
- reverse lobtik (left)
 

You can work all these combinations by varying your responses (to mirror, complementary, etc...). This list is not exhaustive, many other exercises exist which can integrate in Kali Lacoste (Villabrille 8, San Raphael, San Gabriel, San Uriel, Inayan 7, etc...)

 

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